Adobe rung the death bell for Flash for mobile browsers on Wednesday, announcing it is stopping further development of the plug-in and shifting efforts towards HTML5 and its proprietary Adobe AIR software.

“We will no longer continue to develop Flash Player in the browser to work with new mobile device configurations (chipset, browser, OS version, etc.) following the upcoming release of Flash Player 11.1 for Android and BlackBerry PlayBook,” Adobe’s vice president of interactive development, Danny Winokur, wrote in a company blog post.

“We will of course continue to provide critical bug fixes and security updates for existing device configurations. We will also allow our source code licensees to continue working on and release their own implementations,” he added.

Winokur wrote that in the future, Adobe’s work with Flash on mobile devices will focus “on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all the major app stores.” Announcing the shift towards HTML5, a competing technology that is now universally supported on all major mobile devices, Winokur said that HTML5 is “the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms.”

Steve Jobs wins:- Flash has been a bone of contention between Apple Inc. and Adobe since Apple’s former Chief Executive Steve Jobs stood steadfast against featuring it on iPhone and iPad, and said it doesn’t belong to the future of mobile computing. He even posted a letter on Apple’s website in April 2010 criticizing the technology.

“Flash was created during the PC era for PCs and mice,” Jobs wrote. “Flash is a successful business for Adobe, and we can understand why they want to push it beyond PCs. But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards all areas where Flash falls short.”

Microsoft Corp. also recently signaled a move away from Flash on mobile devices, saying in September that Internet Explorer 10 in Windows 8 will not be supporting Web plug-ins on tablets.

The future:- Announcing the shift towards HTML5, a competing technology that is now universally supported on all major mobile devices, Winokur said that HTML5 is “the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms.” However, the company said it is already working on Flash Player 12, and that it can still “innovate with Flash where it can have most impact for the industry, including advanced gaming and premium video.”

On the other hand, Adobe also said that the discontinuation will extend to consumer electronics devices such as televisions, and endorsed that developers prefer to build native apps for them.

“Adobe will continue to support existing licensees who are planning on supporting Flash Player for web browsing on digital home devices and are using the Flash Player Porting Kit to do so,” the company confirmed to GigaOm.

“However we believe the right approach to deliver content on televisions is through applications, not a web browsing experience, and we will continue to encourage the device and content publishing community down that path,” Adobe said.

End for Open Screen Project:- Adobe had launched ‘Open Screen Project’ in 2008, after Apple came out with the iPhone without Flash support, aiming to make a consistent app runtime across multiple devices, so that any Flash application once developed could be distributed across web browsers, mobile devices and TVs. Various notable device manufacturers, telecommunications carriers and content developers allied with Adobe under the program, but companies like Microsoft and Sun Microsystems stayed away.

So far, they have only been able to bring the exposure to Google TV devices, which have also struggled to gain traction in the market.

Article Source: Articles Engine

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